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[Religious Tourism]


MANISA      


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Ulu Mosque and Complex (Central District)


The complex composed of a mosque and a theological school adjacent to it and lodge sections as well as a bath on the northeast of the building was constructed by Ishak Celebi in 1376. It is one of the masterpieces of Turkish wood carving of Turkish Sultanate Period.


Muradiye Mosque and Complex (Central District)


Muradiye Complex, one of the most fascinating constructions of Ottoman architecture of the 16th century, is composed of a mosque, a theological school, an alms house, shops and a library constructed in the 19th century. The mosque was constructed between 1583 and 1588 when Sultan Murad III was a prince.


Sultan Mosque and Complex (Central District)


The complex is composed of a mosque, a theological school, a juvenile school, an alms house and etc and was constructed by Architect Acem Ali in 1522. As mesir paste is thrown out of the minaret of this mosque during mesir festivals held in April every year (Nevruz Day), it is publicly known as “Mesir Mosque”.


Thyatira (Akhisar)


It is understood that there used to be a church in the place where there are brick remains today. This church which is one of the seven churches whose names take place in the New Testament has meanings such as “Permanent Sacrifice” and “Tightly Holder”.


Philadelphia Church (Alasehir)


It is thought that wall remains at the back of a house in the subdistrict Himayei Etfal belong to Philadelphia, one of the seven churches stated in the New Testament. The name of this church means “Fraternal Love” and “Open Gate”.


Sardis (Sard) Church (Salihli)


A church made of bricks and small stones exist next to Artemis Temple in Sard. The name of this church which is one of the seven churches whose names take place in the New Testament means “Remaining Everlasting” and “Walk with Me”.


Sardis (Sard) Synagogue (Salihli)


Sardis Synagogue discovered in 1962 as a result of excavations carried out in Sardis, the capital city of the Lydia Kingdom, is a splendid construction at a length of 120 meters and with a capacity of approximately 1000 people. The shops located on both sides of marble road walked on in order to reach this antique synagogue available for visiting after it was restored belongs to rich Hebrew tradesmen of the period as it is understood from the signs on it.